Why Do We Remember Some Books And Forget Others?

Forgetting books after reading many books is a standard issue to everyone. It's sad yet but true. It's hilarious for a reader when h...

Forgetting books after reading many books is a standard issue to everyone. It's sad yet but true. It's hilarious for a reader when he read lots of books and forget most of them. Some books become a bit fuzzy, as soon as the covers have been closed. However, others remain a long time in our head once the final chapter is finished. This one's characters often assault the reader, even talk to him in the quiet moments when he goes to bed and just before the dream arrives.


Why Do We Remember Some Books And Forget Others?
  They are not usually books that pretend to frighten with the general spooky descriptions; Their stories do not take place in the dark alleyways on stormy nights. More often, they are in streets like the ones we know, in houses very similar to ours. Written in a style that is genuine and realistic, they are often framed in entirely plausible contexts and characters, believable or even real, is far more likely to remember than any horror story.

For example, Truman Capote's "Cold Blooded" book is a detective story about the murder of a family during the robbery of his Kansas home. It is not only the crime story that makes the novel so compelling, but also the way Capote framed the two authors - while one aligned with the reader's expectations of a cold-blooded murderer, the other was courteous and gentle, Defying our prejudices and provoking us an uncomfortable sympathy. In the pages, the unimaginable imagines itself vividly, and the reader is introduced to the humanity in the middle of the horror.
"People remember those things which are emotionally very important to them."
Take a look at Q&A site Quora to learn more, Why people don't remember everything but something? 

It is not just the real crime-a far more plausible terror than any paranormal fact of fiction-which can remain in the reader's mind. A fictional crime novel that is equally difficult to shake off of the head is John Fowles's "The Collector." In the story, a single butterfly collector kidnaps a woman and holds her captive in a basement underneath her house - as another element that would have "collected." Decades later, it was hard not to remember Fowles' book when news came out of the real world where girls from all over the world had been imprisoned inside houses or cellars, many like the hold in The Collector. Because reality surpasses fiction.

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Likewise, it's not hard for the reader to recognize the actual crimes that might have inspired "We have to talk about Kevin." Not only is a crime so memorable, but also Lionel Shriver's portrayal of a struggling mother - ill-equipped in her adjustment to motherhood and with disastrous consequences. In "Lord of the Flies," William Golding also introduced the concept of good and evil in his description of the behavior of the boys on a desert island. Children face challenging conditions and respond with violence, intimidation, and significant power struggles. While they began as children that readers could recognize, by the end of the novel their behavior had degenerated to the point of becoming animalistic.

That is possibly one of the reasons why these books are so chilling - they do not sit snugly in the realm of fantasy - situations and characters are recognizable as we see in the news. And while newsletters can make the viewer shake his head in bewilderment, books take readers further, exposing the experience of both captor and captive. In the pages, the unimaginable imagines itself vividly, and the reader is introduced to the humanity in the middle of the fear.

Encoding, storage, and retrieval are three primary components of long-term memory. These affect how we remember or forget an event. Remembering something is pulling that memory back saved earlier in storage. Learn to save memories in storage in correct formats. 

Does this explain why they are so memorable? 

In some way. Studies have shown that in the same way that we remember bad events, we remember more negative emotions than positive ones. In an interview with the Time magazine, neurobiology expert Matt Wilson said that this ability could be a survival mechanism. "Memory helps us solve problems, and remember things to learn, things that are of particular importance or Have strong emotions attached to them, can be things that are going to be important in the future. That's why negative memories seem to be more easily retrievable than neutral stimuli or even positive ones."

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