5 Phrases You Need to Stop Saying to Your Employees

A boss has the power to affect employees work productivity at the office. This can be affected when the get at home. You should use a helpfu...

A boss has the power to affect employees work productivity at the office. This can be affected when the get at home. You should use a helpful tone when talking to your employees. 

What do your workers listen to when you talk to them? Below are some tips on how to offer productive feedback.

It can be tough to give and receive constructive criticism of employees, which is why many people hate to offer such comments.

5 Phrases You Need to Stop Saying to Your Employees
There are times when the boss says one thing and workers hear another. As a manager of a company, you must think about what you try to communicate and how that information can be captured without causing confusion or resentment.

Here are five things that no employee wants to hear and what the boss should say instead.

1. "You're doing a great job, but..."

What the employee hears: "but..."
It is never a good idea to start making constructive criticisms with a compliment simply because the good words will go unnoticed. It is better to focus separately on what the employee does well and on what needs more help.

Recognizing employees for their accomplishments helps give better feedback, but doing it independently helps them not get lost in what they need to improve and keep working well.
also read: 3 Tips to Inspire Creativity in Your Employees

2. "I need you to be more like ___"

What the employee listens: This person is better than you.

Always focus on each employee by giving feedback. Comparisons are always annoying, whether to show superiority or inferiority. Employees will begin to see their peers as competitors, which can generate tensions and lack of teamwork.

Instead of comparing employees, evaluate their performance according to the mission, vision, and values ??of your business.

3. "Hopefully, we'll start training soon."

What the employee listens: Let's start training you next week.

Words like "luck" or "hopefully" are often not heard. To avoid misinterpretation, it is better to avoid sharing development plans until they are close to bearing fruit. Communicating company expectations and then failing to meet them can hurt the power of management, the company, and the employee.

As an alternative, consider discussing the employee's prospect for the future and how your business can help you meet them. 

4. "How do you think you've played?"

What the employee listen: I already know how you have performed, but I want to see if you are aware of your mistakes.

Not only does it look like a trick question, but it also does not serve to get honest answers. The employee may believe that he is doing a phenomenal job, but he does not say it openly not to show off. On the other hand, there are those who may be aware of not doing their best and are afraid to point it out. Do not ask, tell your employees directly how they have performed and move forward on that basis.
Also read: 7 Ways to Keep Your Employees Happy (and Working Hard)

5. "I'm giving you a chance because ..."

What the employee listens to: If you were someone else, I would have fired you

Feedback should ALWAYS be constructive. It's not about "disciplining" your employees, but about identifying areas of opportunity where they can improve.

Avoid saying anything that can be interpreted negatively by your employees. Rather, it chooses to constructively criticize and offer help in what they may need.

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